Burned Art

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larstheyeti:

the irritable bowel
[theawkwardyeti.com]

larstheyeti:

the irritable bowel

[theawkwardyeti.com]

In the end, Captain America does not make the heroic sacrifice, thus further proving that Black Widow can handle the emotional weight of being a lead character. As if anyone could really forget the most quoted line in “The Avengers” — “I’ve got red in my ledger; I’d like to wipe it out” — it helps to have that line fresh in your mind when deconstructing what Widow does in the final act of what’s billed as a Captain America movie. Black Widow doesn’t wipe out the red in her ledger. No, she blasts her ledger out to the world, like it was the grisliest email forward of all time. We know from her heart to heart with Hawkeye that the shame she feels about what she’s done is real, and she hesitates when she realizes that taking down the bad guys means revealing her secrets. But she does it anyway, because she’s not just a spy anymore; she’s a super hero, and she makes a super hero’s sacrifice.

- x (via jediemma)

notmysecret:

carlinoworld:

Adbeardture time!

I am so in love

This always makes me smile. Always.

(Source: future-finn)

victoriousvocabulary:

SUPERLUNARY
[adjective]
1. belonging to a higher world; celestial.
2. situated above or beyond the moon.
Etymology: Latin super, “prefix for above, beyond, in addition, to an especially high degree” + lunary, from Latin lūnāris, “of the moon”, from lūna, “the moon”.
[ebineyland]

victoriousvocabulary:

SUPERLUNARY

[adjective]

1. belonging to a higher world; celestial.

2. situated above or beyond the moon.

Etymology: Latin super, “prefix for above, beyond, in addition, to an especially high degree” + lunary, from Latin lūnāris, “of the moon”, from lūna, “the moon”.

[ebineyland]

cocklesblowjobs:

(x)

Be crumbled.
So wild flowers will come up where you are.
You have been stony for too many years.
Try something different.
Surrender.

- Rumi (via yeshecholwa)

(Source: oofpoetry)

dobetterbyyou:

I cant..

(Source: meowoofau)

thetestshot:

What’s the deal with gender swapping in advertising at the moment? LGW takes a look at the issues in this great Storify piece 

thetestshot:

What’s the deal with gender swapping in advertising at the moment? LGW takes a look at the issues in this great Storify piece 

kgm42986:


lethalitycomplex:

thedemonica:

i’m pretty sure you created tron

*DAFT PUNK INTENSIFIES*

That’s awesome.

kgm42986:

lethalitycomplex:

thedemonica:

i’m pretty sure you created tron

*DAFT PUNK INTENSIFIES*

That’s awesome.

(Source: oh-noo)

iamftns:

I love soups!

They are such an easy, economic and healthy dish. They are also perfect for people with busy schedules. Check out this amazing soup recipes! 

(Source: symphonyofawesomeness)

lokiloo:

My Buddhist friend was stopped by a Christian fellowship and asked if she would consider following the word of Jesus Christ. She replied, “No, thanks, but maybe next time around.”

I don’t think they got the joke but I nearly died laughing.

numilynn:

Role model.

My tiny hero.

(Source: bussykween)

(Source: intotheredzone)

If anyone slaps you on the right cheek, turn to them the other cheek also

-

Matt 5:39

This specifically refers to a hand striking the side of a person’s face, tells quite a different story when placed in it’s proper historical context. In Jesus’s time, striking someone of a lower class ( a servant) with the back of the hand was used to assert authority and dominance. If the persecuted person “turned the other cheek,” the discipliner was faced with a dilemma. The left hand was used for unclean purposes, so a back-hand strike on the opposite cheek would not be performed. Another alternative would be a slap with the open hand as a challenge or to punch the person, but this was seen as a statement of equality. Thus, by turning the other cheek the persecuted was in effect putting an end to the behavior or if the slapping continued the person would lawfully be deemed equal and have to be released as a servant/slave.   

(via thefullnessofthefaith)

THAT makes a lot more sense, now, thank you. 

(via guardianrock)

I can attest to the original poster’s comments. A few years back I took an intensive seminar on faith-based progressive activism, and we spent an entire unit discussing how many of Jesus’ instructions and stories were performative protests designed to shed light on and ridicule the oppressions of that time period as a way to emphasize the absurdity of the social hierarchy and give people the will and motivation to make changes for a more free and equal society.

For example, the next verse (Matthew 5:40) states “And if anyone wants to sue you and take your shirt, hand over your coat as well.” In that time period, men traditionally wore a shirt and a coat-like garment as their daily wear. To sue someone for their shirt was to put them in their place - suing was generally only performed to take care of outstanding debts, and to be sued for one’s shirt meant that the person was so destitute the only valuable thing they could repay with was their own clothing. However, many cultures at that time (including Hebrew peoples) had prohibitions bordering on taboo against public nudity, so for a sued man to surrender both his shirt and his coat was to turn the system on its head and symbolically state, in a very public forum, that “I have no money with which to repay this person, but they are so insistent on taking advantage of my poverty that I am leaving this hearing buck-ass naked. His greed is the cause of a shameful public spectacle.”

All of a sudden an action of power (suing someone for their shirt) becomes a powerful symbol of subversion and mockery, as the suing patron either accepts the coat (and therefore full responsibility as the cause of the other man’s shameful display) or desperately chases the protester around trying to return his clothes to him, making a fool of himself in front of his peers and the entire gathered community.

Additionally, the next verse (Matthew 5:41; “If anyone forces you to go one mile, go with them two miles.”) was a big middle finger to the Romans who had taken over Judea and were not seen as legitimate authority by the majority of the population there. Roman law stated that a centurion on the march could require a Jew (and possibly other civilians as well, although I don’t remember explicitly) to carry his pack at any time and for any reason for one mile along the road (and because of the importance of the Roman highway system in maintaining rule over the expansive empire, the roads tended to be very well ordered and marked), however hecould not require any service beyond the next mile marker. For a Jewish civilian to carry a centurion’s pack for an entire second mile was a way to subvert the authority of the occupying forces. If the civilian wouldn’t give the pack back at the end of the first mile, the centurion would either have to forcibly take it back or report the civilian to his commanding officer (both of which would result in discipline being taken against the soldier for breaking Roman law) or wait until the civilian volunteered to return the pack, giving the Judean native implicit power over the occupying Roman and completely subverting the power structure of the Empire. Can you imagine how demoralizing that must have been for the highly ordered Roman armies that patrolled the region?

Jesus was a pacifist, but his teachings were in no way passive. There’s a reason he was practically considered a terrorist by the reigning powers, and it wasn’t because he healed the sick and fed the hungry.

(via central-avenue)

 yo i like thisi would like to know more about thiswhere does one learn more about this seconded like whoa

(via wanderingoff)

JESUS JUST GOT SO MUCH MORE BADASS REMEMBER THIS NEXT TIME SOME WHITE CHRISTIAN TELLS YOU TO BE NICE “LIKE CHRIST” REMEMBER THEY’RE ASKING YOU TO BE LIKE THE MIDDLE EASTERN JEW WHO IS TELLING YOU TO BE PASSIVE AGGRESSIVE.

AGGRESSIVE 

(via cherrypieboy)

Your regular reminder that ‘Christlike behaviour’ includes this kind of thing, plus trashing tables in synagogue because of the evils of capitalism.

(via vaspider)


From Mary Lambert’s “(I Know Girls) Body Love”.
(Available for puchase on Society6).

From Mary Lambert’s “(I Know Girls) Body Love”.

(Available for puchase on Society6).

(Source: aerobicblaine)